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How Many Sit Ups Does It Take to Burn Off Wendy’s?

How Many Sit Ups Does It Take to Burn Off Wendy’s?



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“You shall not pass [this fast food fitness exam],” a sage bearded man named Gandalf (sort of) once said. In the spirit of fitness, it’s often fun to see how much of a certain exercise it takes to burn off the foods we eat every day. We were curious to see how many sit ups it would take to burn off some classic meals from Wendy’s, and the results are ab-solutely insane (first sit up pun).

Click here to see what 1,000 calories looks like at different fast food joints.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lists the average female height to be 63.8 inches and weight to be 166.2 pounds. For men, the average height is 69.3 inches and 195.5 pounds. Thus, we used these measurements for a person 35 years of age for the number crunching (there’s another sit up pun) behind the calculations that follow. Keep in mind, these numbers vary and the following results are very “give or take.” Oh, and we assumed that this man and woman could do 30 sit ups in a minute. So, there’s that.

When selecting which menu items to include, we went to the top-ranking informational powerhouse on the internet: Yahoo! Answers. We decided to go with an answer posted seven years ago by a user named Vinegar Clan for some of our menu items while adding in a few personal favorites, all in the name of science. It got one thumbs up and, thus, was deemed the best answer — that’s how we knew it was legit. Without further ado, please enjoy these ab-surd (back at it again with the ab puns!) numbers of sit ups you’d need to do to burn off your Wendy’s.

Oh, we almost forgot: May the odds be ever in your favor. And, as they once said in Liam Neeson’s Taken, “Good luck.”

Crispy Chicken Sandwich
Calories: 350
Number of sit ups for a woman: 1,052.9
Number of sit ups for a man: 895.1

Jr. Bacon Cheeseburger
Calories: 380
Number of sit ups for a woman: 1,143.2
Number of sit ups for a man: 971.9

Medium Classic Chocolate Frosty®
Calories: 460
Number of sit ups for a woman: 1,383.9
Number of sit ups for a man: 1,176.5

10 Piece Spicy Chicken Nuggets
Calories: 470
Number of sit ups for a woman: 1,414.0
Number of sit ups for a man: 1,202.0

Large Natural-Cut Fries
Calories: 530
Number of sit ups for a woman: 1,594.5
Number of sit ups for a man: 1,355.5

Baconator
Calories: 930
Number of sit ups for a woman: 2,797.8
Number of sit ups for a man: 2,378.5


How Far You Have to Run to Burn Off Your Fave Winter Foods

For many of us, the holiday season is filled with traditions. We decorate the house with Christmas trees and menorahs and snowflakes, we attend parties, we exchange gifts. And we eat. Oh, lordy, do we eat. At least, in my family we certainly do.

I’d love to say that I just have a bite or two of my favorite calorie-rich foods and fill the rest of my plate with veggies, but that’s not always the case. Even when I look into calories before I go to a food-filled event, sometimes one glass of champagne turns into three, and before you know it, I’ve eaten a plate of cookies. I guess, when I’m having fun, it’s easy to ignore what those silly numbers mean. What’s 300 calories really, you know?

One thing I can never ignore, though, is how far I have to run to burn off those calories, and I know I’m not alone in this. So, before you decide whether to have a sugar cookie or a candy cane, take a look at how far you’d need to run to burn off the calories in your favorite wintertime foods (based on a 150-pound woman running at a 6-mph pace).

The aforementioned champagne isn’t a big deal if you stop at a glass or two—you’re looking at less than ¾ of a mile to burn off a 4.1-ounce serving. Candy canes are another fairly low-cal option, requiring just about half a mile to cancel one out.

The big dinners weigh in a bit heavier. A 4-ounce serving of roasted ham will take 1.8 miles to burn, and one large croissant is the equivalent of 2.5 miles—amazing when you consider how light and flaky they are, right?

And the holiday season isn’t the holiday season without a sugar cookie (or two) two cookies from the Betty Crocker mix takes 1.5 miles to burn off, with a single gingerbread cookie coming in just below that at 1.3 miles.

Two love ’em or hate ’em holiday foods are fruitcake and eggnog, both of which are going to require some major minutes on the treadmill. For a single 3-ounce serving of Hickory Farms fruitcake, plan on running 3 miles, and if you add a cup of eggnog, tack on another 5K. But, you know, give it 30 minutes or so. Nobody wants to run on a tummy full of eggnog. Yuck.


How Far You Have to Run to Burn Off Your Fave Winter Foods

For many of us, the holiday season is filled with traditions. We decorate the house with Christmas trees and menorahs and snowflakes, we attend parties, we exchange gifts. And we eat. Oh, lordy, do we eat. At least, in my family we certainly do.

I’d love to say that I just have a bite or two of my favorite calorie-rich foods and fill the rest of my plate with veggies, but that’s not always the case. Even when I look into calories before I go to a food-filled event, sometimes one glass of champagne turns into three, and before you know it, I’ve eaten a plate of cookies. I guess, when I’m having fun, it’s easy to ignore what those silly numbers mean. What’s 300 calories really, you know?

One thing I can never ignore, though, is how far I have to run to burn off those calories, and I know I’m not alone in this. So, before you decide whether to have a sugar cookie or a candy cane, take a look at how far you’d need to run to burn off the calories in your favorite wintertime foods (based on a 150-pound woman running at a 6-mph pace).

The aforementioned champagne isn’t a big deal if you stop at a glass or two—you’re looking at less than ¾ of a mile to burn off a 4.1-ounce serving. Candy canes are another fairly low-cal option, requiring just about half a mile to cancel one out.

The big dinners weigh in a bit heavier. A 4-ounce serving of roasted ham will take 1.8 miles to burn, and one large croissant is the equivalent of 2.5 miles—amazing when you consider how light and flaky they are, right?

And the holiday season isn’t the holiday season without a sugar cookie (or two) two cookies from the Betty Crocker mix takes 1.5 miles to burn off, with a single gingerbread cookie coming in just below that at 1.3 miles.

Two love ’em or hate ’em holiday foods are fruitcake and eggnog, both of which are going to require some major minutes on the treadmill. For a single 3-ounce serving of Hickory Farms fruitcake, plan on running 3 miles, and if you add a cup of eggnog, tack on another 5K. But, you know, give it 30 minutes or so. Nobody wants to run on a tummy full of eggnog. Yuck.


How Far You Have to Run to Burn Off Your Fave Winter Foods

For many of us, the holiday season is filled with traditions. We decorate the house with Christmas trees and menorahs and snowflakes, we attend parties, we exchange gifts. And we eat. Oh, lordy, do we eat. At least, in my family we certainly do.

I’d love to say that I just have a bite or two of my favorite calorie-rich foods and fill the rest of my plate with veggies, but that’s not always the case. Even when I look into calories before I go to a food-filled event, sometimes one glass of champagne turns into three, and before you know it, I’ve eaten a plate of cookies. I guess, when I’m having fun, it’s easy to ignore what those silly numbers mean. What’s 300 calories really, you know?

One thing I can never ignore, though, is how far I have to run to burn off those calories, and I know I’m not alone in this. So, before you decide whether to have a sugar cookie or a candy cane, take a look at how far you’d need to run to burn off the calories in your favorite wintertime foods (based on a 150-pound woman running at a 6-mph pace).

The aforementioned champagne isn’t a big deal if you stop at a glass or two—you’re looking at less than ¾ of a mile to burn off a 4.1-ounce serving. Candy canes are another fairly low-cal option, requiring just about half a mile to cancel one out.

The big dinners weigh in a bit heavier. A 4-ounce serving of roasted ham will take 1.8 miles to burn, and one large croissant is the equivalent of 2.5 miles—amazing when you consider how light and flaky they are, right?

And the holiday season isn’t the holiday season without a sugar cookie (or two) two cookies from the Betty Crocker mix takes 1.5 miles to burn off, with a single gingerbread cookie coming in just below that at 1.3 miles.

Two love ’em or hate ’em holiday foods are fruitcake and eggnog, both of which are going to require some major minutes on the treadmill. For a single 3-ounce serving of Hickory Farms fruitcake, plan on running 3 miles, and if you add a cup of eggnog, tack on another 5K. But, you know, give it 30 minutes or so. Nobody wants to run on a tummy full of eggnog. Yuck.


How Far You Have to Run to Burn Off Your Fave Winter Foods

For many of us, the holiday season is filled with traditions. We decorate the house with Christmas trees and menorahs and snowflakes, we attend parties, we exchange gifts. And we eat. Oh, lordy, do we eat. At least, in my family we certainly do.

I’d love to say that I just have a bite or two of my favorite calorie-rich foods and fill the rest of my plate with veggies, but that’s not always the case. Even when I look into calories before I go to a food-filled event, sometimes one glass of champagne turns into three, and before you know it, I’ve eaten a plate of cookies. I guess, when I’m having fun, it’s easy to ignore what those silly numbers mean. What’s 300 calories really, you know?

One thing I can never ignore, though, is how far I have to run to burn off those calories, and I know I’m not alone in this. So, before you decide whether to have a sugar cookie or a candy cane, take a look at how far you’d need to run to burn off the calories in your favorite wintertime foods (based on a 150-pound woman running at a 6-mph pace).

The aforementioned champagne isn’t a big deal if you stop at a glass or two—you’re looking at less than ¾ of a mile to burn off a 4.1-ounce serving. Candy canes are another fairly low-cal option, requiring just about half a mile to cancel one out.

The big dinners weigh in a bit heavier. A 4-ounce serving of roasted ham will take 1.8 miles to burn, and one large croissant is the equivalent of 2.5 miles—amazing when you consider how light and flaky they are, right?

And the holiday season isn’t the holiday season without a sugar cookie (or two) two cookies from the Betty Crocker mix takes 1.5 miles to burn off, with a single gingerbread cookie coming in just below that at 1.3 miles.

Two love ’em or hate ’em holiday foods are fruitcake and eggnog, both of which are going to require some major minutes on the treadmill. For a single 3-ounce serving of Hickory Farms fruitcake, plan on running 3 miles, and if you add a cup of eggnog, tack on another 5K. But, you know, give it 30 minutes or so. Nobody wants to run on a tummy full of eggnog. Yuck.


How Far You Have to Run to Burn Off Your Fave Winter Foods

For many of us, the holiday season is filled with traditions. We decorate the house with Christmas trees and menorahs and snowflakes, we attend parties, we exchange gifts. And we eat. Oh, lordy, do we eat. At least, in my family we certainly do.

I’d love to say that I just have a bite or two of my favorite calorie-rich foods and fill the rest of my plate with veggies, but that’s not always the case. Even when I look into calories before I go to a food-filled event, sometimes one glass of champagne turns into three, and before you know it, I’ve eaten a plate of cookies. I guess, when I’m having fun, it’s easy to ignore what those silly numbers mean. What’s 300 calories really, you know?

One thing I can never ignore, though, is how far I have to run to burn off those calories, and I know I’m not alone in this. So, before you decide whether to have a sugar cookie or a candy cane, take a look at how far you’d need to run to burn off the calories in your favorite wintertime foods (based on a 150-pound woman running at a 6-mph pace).

The aforementioned champagne isn’t a big deal if you stop at a glass or two—you’re looking at less than ¾ of a mile to burn off a 4.1-ounce serving. Candy canes are another fairly low-cal option, requiring just about half a mile to cancel one out.

The big dinners weigh in a bit heavier. A 4-ounce serving of roasted ham will take 1.8 miles to burn, and one large croissant is the equivalent of 2.5 miles—amazing when you consider how light and flaky they are, right?

And the holiday season isn’t the holiday season without a sugar cookie (or two) two cookies from the Betty Crocker mix takes 1.5 miles to burn off, with a single gingerbread cookie coming in just below that at 1.3 miles.

Two love ’em or hate ’em holiday foods are fruitcake and eggnog, both of which are going to require some major minutes on the treadmill. For a single 3-ounce serving of Hickory Farms fruitcake, plan on running 3 miles, and if you add a cup of eggnog, tack on another 5K. But, you know, give it 30 minutes or so. Nobody wants to run on a tummy full of eggnog. Yuck.


How Far You Have to Run to Burn Off Your Fave Winter Foods

For many of us, the holiday season is filled with traditions. We decorate the house with Christmas trees and menorahs and snowflakes, we attend parties, we exchange gifts. And we eat. Oh, lordy, do we eat. At least, in my family we certainly do.

I’d love to say that I just have a bite or two of my favorite calorie-rich foods and fill the rest of my plate with veggies, but that’s not always the case. Even when I look into calories before I go to a food-filled event, sometimes one glass of champagne turns into three, and before you know it, I’ve eaten a plate of cookies. I guess, when I’m having fun, it’s easy to ignore what those silly numbers mean. What’s 300 calories really, you know?

One thing I can never ignore, though, is how far I have to run to burn off those calories, and I know I’m not alone in this. So, before you decide whether to have a sugar cookie or a candy cane, take a look at how far you’d need to run to burn off the calories in your favorite wintertime foods (based on a 150-pound woman running at a 6-mph pace).

The aforementioned champagne isn’t a big deal if you stop at a glass or two—you’re looking at less than ¾ of a mile to burn off a 4.1-ounce serving. Candy canes are another fairly low-cal option, requiring just about half a mile to cancel one out.

The big dinners weigh in a bit heavier. A 4-ounce serving of roasted ham will take 1.8 miles to burn, and one large croissant is the equivalent of 2.5 miles—amazing when you consider how light and flaky they are, right?

And the holiday season isn’t the holiday season without a sugar cookie (or two) two cookies from the Betty Crocker mix takes 1.5 miles to burn off, with a single gingerbread cookie coming in just below that at 1.3 miles.

Two love ’em or hate ’em holiday foods are fruitcake and eggnog, both of which are going to require some major minutes on the treadmill. For a single 3-ounce serving of Hickory Farms fruitcake, plan on running 3 miles, and if you add a cup of eggnog, tack on another 5K. But, you know, give it 30 minutes or so. Nobody wants to run on a tummy full of eggnog. Yuck.


How Far You Have to Run to Burn Off Your Fave Winter Foods

For many of us, the holiday season is filled with traditions. We decorate the house with Christmas trees and menorahs and snowflakes, we attend parties, we exchange gifts. And we eat. Oh, lordy, do we eat. At least, in my family we certainly do.

I’d love to say that I just have a bite or two of my favorite calorie-rich foods and fill the rest of my plate with veggies, but that’s not always the case. Even when I look into calories before I go to a food-filled event, sometimes one glass of champagne turns into three, and before you know it, I’ve eaten a plate of cookies. I guess, when I’m having fun, it’s easy to ignore what those silly numbers mean. What’s 300 calories really, you know?

One thing I can never ignore, though, is how far I have to run to burn off those calories, and I know I’m not alone in this. So, before you decide whether to have a sugar cookie or a candy cane, take a look at how far you’d need to run to burn off the calories in your favorite wintertime foods (based on a 150-pound woman running at a 6-mph pace).

The aforementioned champagne isn’t a big deal if you stop at a glass or two—you’re looking at less than ¾ of a mile to burn off a 4.1-ounce serving. Candy canes are another fairly low-cal option, requiring just about half a mile to cancel one out.

The big dinners weigh in a bit heavier. A 4-ounce serving of roasted ham will take 1.8 miles to burn, and one large croissant is the equivalent of 2.5 miles—amazing when you consider how light and flaky they are, right?

And the holiday season isn’t the holiday season without a sugar cookie (or two) two cookies from the Betty Crocker mix takes 1.5 miles to burn off, with a single gingerbread cookie coming in just below that at 1.3 miles.

Two love ’em or hate ’em holiday foods are fruitcake and eggnog, both of which are going to require some major minutes on the treadmill. For a single 3-ounce serving of Hickory Farms fruitcake, plan on running 3 miles, and if you add a cup of eggnog, tack on another 5K. But, you know, give it 30 minutes or so. Nobody wants to run on a tummy full of eggnog. Yuck.


How Far You Have to Run to Burn Off Your Fave Winter Foods

For many of us, the holiday season is filled with traditions. We decorate the house with Christmas trees and menorahs and snowflakes, we attend parties, we exchange gifts. And we eat. Oh, lordy, do we eat. At least, in my family we certainly do.

I’d love to say that I just have a bite or two of my favorite calorie-rich foods and fill the rest of my plate with veggies, but that’s not always the case. Even when I look into calories before I go to a food-filled event, sometimes one glass of champagne turns into three, and before you know it, I’ve eaten a plate of cookies. I guess, when I’m having fun, it’s easy to ignore what those silly numbers mean. What’s 300 calories really, you know?

One thing I can never ignore, though, is how far I have to run to burn off those calories, and I know I’m not alone in this. So, before you decide whether to have a sugar cookie or a candy cane, take a look at how far you’d need to run to burn off the calories in your favorite wintertime foods (based on a 150-pound woman running at a 6-mph pace).

The aforementioned champagne isn’t a big deal if you stop at a glass or two—you’re looking at less than ¾ of a mile to burn off a 4.1-ounce serving. Candy canes are another fairly low-cal option, requiring just about half a mile to cancel one out.

The big dinners weigh in a bit heavier. A 4-ounce serving of roasted ham will take 1.8 miles to burn, and one large croissant is the equivalent of 2.5 miles—amazing when you consider how light and flaky they are, right?

And the holiday season isn’t the holiday season without a sugar cookie (or two) two cookies from the Betty Crocker mix takes 1.5 miles to burn off, with a single gingerbread cookie coming in just below that at 1.3 miles.

Two love ’em or hate ’em holiday foods are fruitcake and eggnog, both of which are going to require some major minutes on the treadmill. For a single 3-ounce serving of Hickory Farms fruitcake, plan on running 3 miles, and if you add a cup of eggnog, tack on another 5K. But, you know, give it 30 minutes or so. Nobody wants to run on a tummy full of eggnog. Yuck.


How Far You Have to Run to Burn Off Your Fave Winter Foods

For many of us, the holiday season is filled with traditions. We decorate the house with Christmas trees and menorahs and snowflakes, we attend parties, we exchange gifts. And we eat. Oh, lordy, do we eat. At least, in my family we certainly do.

I’d love to say that I just have a bite or two of my favorite calorie-rich foods and fill the rest of my plate with veggies, but that’s not always the case. Even when I look into calories before I go to a food-filled event, sometimes one glass of champagne turns into three, and before you know it, I’ve eaten a plate of cookies. I guess, when I’m having fun, it’s easy to ignore what those silly numbers mean. What’s 300 calories really, you know?

One thing I can never ignore, though, is how far I have to run to burn off those calories, and I know I’m not alone in this. So, before you decide whether to have a sugar cookie or a candy cane, take a look at how far you’d need to run to burn off the calories in your favorite wintertime foods (based on a 150-pound woman running at a 6-mph pace).

The aforementioned champagne isn’t a big deal if you stop at a glass or two—you’re looking at less than ¾ of a mile to burn off a 4.1-ounce serving. Candy canes are another fairly low-cal option, requiring just about half a mile to cancel one out.

The big dinners weigh in a bit heavier. A 4-ounce serving of roasted ham will take 1.8 miles to burn, and one large croissant is the equivalent of 2.5 miles—amazing when you consider how light and flaky they are, right?

And the holiday season isn’t the holiday season without a sugar cookie (or two) two cookies from the Betty Crocker mix takes 1.5 miles to burn off, with a single gingerbread cookie coming in just below that at 1.3 miles.

Two love ’em or hate ’em holiday foods are fruitcake and eggnog, both of which are going to require some major minutes on the treadmill. For a single 3-ounce serving of Hickory Farms fruitcake, plan on running 3 miles, and if you add a cup of eggnog, tack on another 5K. But, you know, give it 30 minutes or so. Nobody wants to run on a tummy full of eggnog. Yuck.


How Far You Have to Run to Burn Off Your Fave Winter Foods

For many of us, the holiday season is filled with traditions. We decorate the house with Christmas trees and menorahs and snowflakes, we attend parties, we exchange gifts. And we eat. Oh, lordy, do we eat. At least, in my family we certainly do.

I’d love to say that I just have a bite or two of my favorite calorie-rich foods and fill the rest of my plate with veggies, but that’s not always the case. Even when I look into calories before I go to a food-filled event, sometimes one glass of champagne turns into three, and before you know it, I’ve eaten a plate of cookies. I guess, when I’m having fun, it’s easy to ignore what those silly numbers mean. What’s 300 calories really, you know?

One thing I can never ignore, though, is how far I have to run to burn off those calories, and I know I’m not alone in this. So, before you decide whether to have a sugar cookie or a candy cane, take a look at how far you’d need to run to burn off the calories in your favorite wintertime foods (based on a 150-pound woman running at a 6-mph pace).

The aforementioned champagne isn’t a big deal if you stop at a glass or two—you’re looking at less than ¾ of a mile to burn off a 4.1-ounce serving. Candy canes are another fairly low-cal option, requiring just about half a mile to cancel one out.

The big dinners weigh in a bit heavier. A 4-ounce serving of roasted ham will take 1.8 miles to burn, and one large croissant is the equivalent of 2.5 miles—amazing when you consider how light and flaky they are, right?

And the holiday season isn’t the holiday season without a sugar cookie (or two) two cookies from the Betty Crocker mix takes 1.5 miles to burn off, with a single gingerbread cookie coming in just below that at 1.3 miles.

Two love ’em or hate ’em holiday foods are fruitcake and eggnog, both of which are going to require some major minutes on the treadmill. For a single 3-ounce serving of Hickory Farms fruitcake, plan on running 3 miles, and if you add a cup of eggnog, tack on another 5K. But, you know, give it 30 minutes or so. Nobody wants to run on a tummy full of eggnog. Yuck.


Watch the video: Free pretzel burger and 10 piece nugget from Wendys #wendys (August 2022).