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Grilled Polenta With Corn and Parmesan

Grilled Polenta With Corn and Parmesan



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Set a skillet over medium heat. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil. Add onion and cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add corn and cook for about 3 minutes until heated through. Remove from the heat.

In a medium saucepan, bring 2 cups water and 1 teaspoon salt to a boil.

In a medium bowl, whisks together the cornmeal and remaining cup of water.

Whisk cornmeal mixture into boiling water, and bring back to a boil. Cook, stirring often, until the polenta is smooth and thick, about 30 minutes. Stir in the corn and onion mixture.

Brush a deep 11-inch-by-7-inch dish with oil. Pour the polenta into the dish and let cool completely.

Heat a grill to medium-high heat, and brush the grill grates with oil. Cut the polenta into 12 squares. Brush both sides with oil. Place on the grill and cover the grill. Grill until golden-brown, about 3 minutes per side. In the last minute, sprinkle Parmesan on top. Serve hot.


Now, don’t be worried if you don’t know! I had never heard of polenta until I married my Italian husband. Polenta is a very simple porridge, if you will, made of cornmeal. If you’re thinking, “that sounds a lot like grits” you wouldn’t be too far off base.

What’s the difference between polenta and grits?

Polenta is a staple in Italian cuisine, made of yellow cornmeal, usually ground coarsely. Grits, commonly served in the southern part of the United States, are made of a more finely ground white corn.

I was first introduced to a creamy polenta, cooked on the stovetop. But instead of sticking with just polenta, my husband stirred in browned Italian sausage and cheese. Talk about comfort food!

Polenta is one of those flexible and versatile recipes that can be prepared in a number of ways. You can use water, milk, chicken stock, or vegetable broth to cook the corn for polenta.

The recipe for cooking polenta often depends on family traditions and personal preferences. And as evidenced by my husband, it can be customized by adding grated Parmesan cheese, butter, and/or any combination of fresh herbs and spices. Or sausage!

We often eat a simple bowl full of creamy polenta with sausage or various toppings. Grilled or fried polenta makes an excellent side dish, too. In fact, while I’d never had polenta at all until I met my husband, I never tried fried polenta until we were on our honeymoon! That was just not how his family served it. (But, dang, it was good!)

Some traditionalists argue that water is the only acceptable choice for making polenta because it yields the lightest, most distinctively corn flavor. On the other hand, some argue that chicken or vegetable stock infuses the polenta with more flavor, while others prefer the richer and creamier taste associated with adding milk or half & half.

Is this creamy polenta recipe gluten free?

Yes. In its simplest form, polenta is simply cornmeal and water. Since corn is gluten free, polenta makes for a good starchy dish for those who are avoiding wheat and gluten.

Is this a vegan polenta recipe?

Again, yes, in its simplest form. Made with water and sans any extra additions (as spelled out below), polenta is completely vegan. If you’ve got a “mixed” household, you can make the polenta with water, then scoop out enough for the vegans in the family before stirring in any extras (like sausage or butter).

How to make polenta

This polenta recipe is made on the stove top. While it’s not a difficult recipe to make, it does require that you stick close by to stir the pot as the cornmeal cooks. This remains the same whether you use water or opt for a richer liquid such as broth or milk.

Once the cornmeal is cooked, you can serve the creamy polenta right out of the pot, topped with this delicious braised Tuscan pork or even a meaty marinara sauce).

To make grilled or fried polenta, pour the cooked polenta into a baking dish to cool. Polenta firms up as it cools, which allows you to cut it into the triangular shapes that are perfect for grilling or frying it.

Whether you opt for creamy polenta or grilled polenta, you can’t go wrong serving it with this beef ragu!


Now, don’t be worried if you don’t know! I had never heard of polenta until I married my Italian husband. Polenta is a very simple porridge, if you will, made of cornmeal. If you’re thinking, “that sounds a lot like grits” you wouldn’t be too far off base.

What’s the difference between polenta and grits?

Polenta is a staple in Italian cuisine, made of yellow cornmeal, usually ground coarsely. Grits, commonly served in the southern part of the United States, are made of a more finely ground white corn.

I was first introduced to a creamy polenta, cooked on the stovetop. But instead of sticking with just polenta, my husband stirred in browned Italian sausage and cheese. Talk about comfort food!

Polenta is one of those flexible and versatile recipes that can be prepared in a number of ways. You can use water, milk, chicken stock, or vegetable broth to cook the corn for polenta.

The recipe for cooking polenta often depends on family traditions and personal preferences. And as evidenced by my husband, it can be customized by adding grated Parmesan cheese, butter, and/or any combination of fresh herbs and spices. Or sausage!

We often eat a simple bowl full of creamy polenta with sausage or various toppings. Grilled or fried polenta makes an excellent side dish, too. In fact, while I’d never had polenta at all until I met my husband, I never tried fried polenta until we were on our honeymoon! That was just not how his family served it. (But, dang, it was good!)

Some traditionalists argue that water is the only acceptable choice for making polenta because it yields the lightest, most distinctively corn flavor. On the other hand, some argue that chicken or vegetable stock infuses the polenta with more flavor, while others prefer the richer and creamier taste associated with adding milk or half & half.

Is this creamy polenta recipe gluten free?

Yes. In its simplest form, polenta is simply cornmeal and water. Since corn is gluten free, polenta makes for a good starchy dish for those who are avoiding wheat and gluten.

Is this a vegan polenta recipe?

Again, yes, in its simplest form. Made with water and sans any extra additions (as spelled out below), polenta is completely vegan. If you’ve got a “mixed” household, you can make the polenta with water, then scoop out enough for the vegans in the family before stirring in any extras (like sausage or butter).

How to make polenta

This polenta recipe is made on the stove top. While it’s not a difficult recipe to make, it does require that you stick close by to stir the pot as the cornmeal cooks. This remains the same whether you use water or opt for a richer liquid such as broth or milk.

Once the cornmeal is cooked, you can serve the creamy polenta right out of the pot, topped with this delicious braised Tuscan pork or even a meaty marinara sauce).

To make grilled or fried polenta, pour the cooked polenta into a baking dish to cool. Polenta firms up as it cools, which allows you to cut it into the triangular shapes that are perfect for grilling or frying it.

Whether you opt for creamy polenta or grilled polenta, you can’t go wrong serving it with this beef ragu!


Now, don’t be worried if you don’t know! I had never heard of polenta until I married my Italian husband. Polenta is a very simple porridge, if you will, made of cornmeal. If you’re thinking, “that sounds a lot like grits” you wouldn’t be too far off base.

What’s the difference between polenta and grits?

Polenta is a staple in Italian cuisine, made of yellow cornmeal, usually ground coarsely. Grits, commonly served in the southern part of the United States, are made of a more finely ground white corn.

I was first introduced to a creamy polenta, cooked on the stovetop. But instead of sticking with just polenta, my husband stirred in browned Italian sausage and cheese. Talk about comfort food!

Polenta is one of those flexible and versatile recipes that can be prepared in a number of ways. You can use water, milk, chicken stock, or vegetable broth to cook the corn for polenta.

The recipe for cooking polenta often depends on family traditions and personal preferences. And as evidenced by my husband, it can be customized by adding grated Parmesan cheese, butter, and/or any combination of fresh herbs and spices. Or sausage!

We often eat a simple bowl full of creamy polenta with sausage or various toppings. Grilled or fried polenta makes an excellent side dish, too. In fact, while I’d never had polenta at all until I met my husband, I never tried fried polenta until we were on our honeymoon! That was just not how his family served it. (But, dang, it was good!)

Some traditionalists argue that water is the only acceptable choice for making polenta because it yields the lightest, most distinctively corn flavor. On the other hand, some argue that chicken or vegetable stock infuses the polenta with more flavor, while others prefer the richer and creamier taste associated with adding milk or half & half.

Is this creamy polenta recipe gluten free?

Yes. In its simplest form, polenta is simply cornmeal and water. Since corn is gluten free, polenta makes for a good starchy dish for those who are avoiding wheat and gluten.

Is this a vegan polenta recipe?

Again, yes, in its simplest form. Made with water and sans any extra additions (as spelled out below), polenta is completely vegan. If you’ve got a “mixed” household, you can make the polenta with water, then scoop out enough for the vegans in the family before stirring in any extras (like sausage or butter).

How to make polenta

This polenta recipe is made on the stove top. While it’s not a difficult recipe to make, it does require that you stick close by to stir the pot as the cornmeal cooks. This remains the same whether you use water or opt for a richer liquid such as broth or milk.

Once the cornmeal is cooked, you can serve the creamy polenta right out of the pot, topped with this delicious braised Tuscan pork or even a meaty marinara sauce).

To make grilled or fried polenta, pour the cooked polenta into a baking dish to cool. Polenta firms up as it cools, which allows you to cut it into the triangular shapes that are perfect for grilling or frying it.

Whether you opt for creamy polenta or grilled polenta, you can’t go wrong serving it with this beef ragu!


Now, don’t be worried if you don’t know! I had never heard of polenta until I married my Italian husband. Polenta is a very simple porridge, if you will, made of cornmeal. If you’re thinking, “that sounds a lot like grits” you wouldn’t be too far off base.

What’s the difference between polenta and grits?

Polenta is a staple in Italian cuisine, made of yellow cornmeal, usually ground coarsely. Grits, commonly served in the southern part of the United States, are made of a more finely ground white corn.

I was first introduced to a creamy polenta, cooked on the stovetop. But instead of sticking with just polenta, my husband stirred in browned Italian sausage and cheese. Talk about comfort food!

Polenta is one of those flexible and versatile recipes that can be prepared in a number of ways. You can use water, milk, chicken stock, or vegetable broth to cook the corn for polenta.

The recipe for cooking polenta often depends on family traditions and personal preferences. And as evidenced by my husband, it can be customized by adding grated Parmesan cheese, butter, and/or any combination of fresh herbs and spices. Or sausage!

We often eat a simple bowl full of creamy polenta with sausage or various toppings. Grilled or fried polenta makes an excellent side dish, too. In fact, while I’d never had polenta at all until I met my husband, I never tried fried polenta until we were on our honeymoon! That was just not how his family served it. (But, dang, it was good!)

Some traditionalists argue that water is the only acceptable choice for making polenta because it yields the lightest, most distinctively corn flavor. On the other hand, some argue that chicken or vegetable stock infuses the polenta with more flavor, while others prefer the richer and creamier taste associated with adding milk or half & half.

Is this creamy polenta recipe gluten free?

Yes. In its simplest form, polenta is simply cornmeal and water. Since corn is gluten free, polenta makes for a good starchy dish for those who are avoiding wheat and gluten.

Is this a vegan polenta recipe?

Again, yes, in its simplest form. Made with water and sans any extra additions (as spelled out below), polenta is completely vegan. If you’ve got a “mixed” household, you can make the polenta with water, then scoop out enough for the vegans in the family before stirring in any extras (like sausage or butter).

How to make polenta

This polenta recipe is made on the stove top. While it’s not a difficult recipe to make, it does require that you stick close by to stir the pot as the cornmeal cooks. This remains the same whether you use water or opt for a richer liquid such as broth or milk.

Once the cornmeal is cooked, you can serve the creamy polenta right out of the pot, topped with this delicious braised Tuscan pork or even a meaty marinara sauce).

To make grilled or fried polenta, pour the cooked polenta into a baking dish to cool. Polenta firms up as it cools, which allows you to cut it into the triangular shapes that are perfect for grilling or frying it.

Whether you opt for creamy polenta or grilled polenta, you can’t go wrong serving it with this beef ragu!


Now, don’t be worried if you don’t know! I had never heard of polenta until I married my Italian husband. Polenta is a very simple porridge, if you will, made of cornmeal. If you’re thinking, “that sounds a lot like grits” you wouldn’t be too far off base.

What’s the difference between polenta and grits?

Polenta is a staple in Italian cuisine, made of yellow cornmeal, usually ground coarsely. Grits, commonly served in the southern part of the United States, are made of a more finely ground white corn.

I was first introduced to a creamy polenta, cooked on the stovetop. But instead of sticking with just polenta, my husband stirred in browned Italian sausage and cheese. Talk about comfort food!

Polenta is one of those flexible and versatile recipes that can be prepared in a number of ways. You can use water, milk, chicken stock, or vegetable broth to cook the corn for polenta.

The recipe for cooking polenta often depends on family traditions and personal preferences. And as evidenced by my husband, it can be customized by adding grated Parmesan cheese, butter, and/or any combination of fresh herbs and spices. Or sausage!

We often eat a simple bowl full of creamy polenta with sausage or various toppings. Grilled or fried polenta makes an excellent side dish, too. In fact, while I’d never had polenta at all until I met my husband, I never tried fried polenta until we were on our honeymoon! That was just not how his family served it. (But, dang, it was good!)

Some traditionalists argue that water is the only acceptable choice for making polenta because it yields the lightest, most distinctively corn flavor. On the other hand, some argue that chicken or vegetable stock infuses the polenta with more flavor, while others prefer the richer and creamier taste associated with adding milk or half & half.

Is this creamy polenta recipe gluten free?

Yes. In its simplest form, polenta is simply cornmeal and water. Since corn is gluten free, polenta makes for a good starchy dish for those who are avoiding wheat and gluten.

Is this a vegan polenta recipe?

Again, yes, in its simplest form. Made with water and sans any extra additions (as spelled out below), polenta is completely vegan. If you’ve got a “mixed” household, you can make the polenta with water, then scoop out enough for the vegans in the family before stirring in any extras (like sausage or butter).

How to make polenta

This polenta recipe is made on the stove top. While it’s not a difficult recipe to make, it does require that you stick close by to stir the pot as the cornmeal cooks. This remains the same whether you use water or opt for a richer liquid such as broth or milk.

Once the cornmeal is cooked, you can serve the creamy polenta right out of the pot, topped with this delicious braised Tuscan pork or even a meaty marinara sauce).

To make grilled or fried polenta, pour the cooked polenta into a baking dish to cool. Polenta firms up as it cools, which allows you to cut it into the triangular shapes that are perfect for grilling or frying it.

Whether you opt for creamy polenta or grilled polenta, you can’t go wrong serving it with this beef ragu!


Now, don’t be worried if you don’t know! I had never heard of polenta until I married my Italian husband. Polenta is a very simple porridge, if you will, made of cornmeal. If you’re thinking, “that sounds a lot like grits” you wouldn’t be too far off base.

What’s the difference between polenta and grits?

Polenta is a staple in Italian cuisine, made of yellow cornmeal, usually ground coarsely. Grits, commonly served in the southern part of the United States, are made of a more finely ground white corn.

I was first introduced to a creamy polenta, cooked on the stovetop. But instead of sticking with just polenta, my husband stirred in browned Italian sausage and cheese. Talk about comfort food!

Polenta is one of those flexible and versatile recipes that can be prepared in a number of ways. You can use water, milk, chicken stock, or vegetable broth to cook the corn for polenta.

The recipe for cooking polenta often depends on family traditions and personal preferences. And as evidenced by my husband, it can be customized by adding grated Parmesan cheese, butter, and/or any combination of fresh herbs and spices. Or sausage!

We often eat a simple bowl full of creamy polenta with sausage or various toppings. Grilled or fried polenta makes an excellent side dish, too. In fact, while I’d never had polenta at all until I met my husband, I never tried fried polenta until we were on our honeymoon! That was just not how his family served it. (But, dang, it was good!)

Some traditionalists argue that water is the only acceptable choice for making polenta because it yields the lightest, most distinctively corn flavor. On the other hand, some argue that chicken or vegetable stock infuses the polenta with more flavor, while others prefer the richer and creamier taste associated with adding milk or half & half.

Is this creamy polenta recipe gluten free?

Yes. In its simplest form, polenta is simply cornmeal and water. Since corn is gluten free, polenta makes for a good starchy dish for those who are avoiding wheat and gluten.

Is this a vegan polenta recipe?

Again, yes, in its simplest form. Made with water and sans any extra additions (as spelled out below), polenta is completely vegan. If you’ve got a “mixed” household, you can make the polenta with water, then scoop out enough for the vegans in the family before stirring in any extras (like sausage or butter).

How to make polenta

This polenta recipe is made on the stove top. While it’s not a difficult recipe to make, it does require that you stick close by to stir the pot as the cornmeal cooks. This remains the same whether you use water or opt for a richer liquid such as broth or milk.

Once the cornmeal is cooked, you can serve the creamy polenta right out of the pot, topped with this delicious braised Tuscan pork or even a meaty marinara sauce).

To make grilled or fried polenta, pour the cooked polenta into a baking dish to cool. Polenta firms up as it cools, which allows you to cut it into the triangular shapes that are perfect for grilling or frying it.

Whether you opt for creamy polenta or grilled polenta, you can’t go wrong serving it with this beef ragu!


Now, don’t be worried if you don’t know! I had never heard of polenta until I married my Italian husband. Polenta is a very simple porridge, if you will, made of cornmeal. If you’re thinking, “that sounds a lot like grits” you wouldn’t be too far off base.

What’s the difference between polenta and grits?

Polenta is a staple in Italian cuisine, made of yellow cornmeal, usually ground coarsely. Grits, commonly served in the southern part of the United States, are made of a more finely ground white corn.

I was first introduced to a creamy polenta, cooked on the stovetop. But instead of sticking with just polenta, my husband stirred in browned Italian sausage and cheese. Talk about comfort food!

Polenta is one of those flexible and versatile recipes that can be prepared in a number of ways. You can use water, milk, chicken stock, or vegetable broth to cook the corn for polenta.

The recipe for cooking polenta often depends on family traditions and personal preferences. And as evidenced by my husband, it can be customized by adding grated Parmesan cheese, butter, and/or any combination of fresh herbs and spices. Or sausage!

We often eat a simple bowl full of creamy polenta with sausage or various toppings. Grilled or fried polenta makes an excellent side dish, too. In fact, while I’d never had polenta at all until I met my husband, I never tried fried polenta until we were on our honeymoon! That was just not how his family served it. (But, dang, it was good!)

Some traditionalists argue that water is the only acceptable choice for making polenta because it yields the lightest, most distinctively corn flavor. On the other hand, some argue that chicken or vegetable stock infuses the polenta with more flavor, while others prefer the richer and creamier taste associated with adding milk or half & half.

Is this creamy polenta recipe gluten free?

Yes. In its simplest form, polenta is simply cornmeal and water. Since corn is gluten free, polenta makes for a good starchy dish for those who are avoiding wheat and gluten.

Is this a vegan polenta recipe?

Again, yes, in its simplest form. Made with water and sans any extra additions (as spelled out below), polenta is completely vegan. If you’ve got a “mixed” household, you can make the polenta with water, then scoop out enough for the vegans in the family before stirring in any extras (like sausage or butter).

How to make polenta

This polenta recipe is made on the stove top. While it’s not a difficult recipe to make, it does require that you stick close by to stir the pot as the cornmeal cooks. This remains the same whether you use water or opt for a richer liquid such as broth or milk.

Once the cornmeal is cooked, you can serve the creamy polenta right out of the pot, topped with this delicious braised Tuscan pork or even a meaty marinara sauce).

To make grilled or fried polenta, pour the cooked polenta into a baking dish to cool. Polenta firms up as it cools, which allows you to cut it into the triangular shapes that are perfect for grilling or frying it.

Whether you opt for creamy polenta or grilled polenta, you can’t go wrong serving it with this beef ragu!


Now, don’t be worried if you don’t know! I had never heard of polenta until I married my Italian husband. Polenta is a very simple porridge, if you will, made of cornmeal. If you’re thinking, “that sounds a lot like grits” you wouldn’t be too far off base.

What’s the difference between polenta and grits?

Polenta is a staple in Italian cuisine, made of yellow cornmeal, usually ground coarsely. Grits, commonly served in the southern part of the United States, are made of a more finely ground white corn.

I was first introduced to a creamy polenta, cooked on the stovetop. But instead of sticking with just polenta, my husband stirred in browned Italian sausage and cheese. Talk about comfort food!

Polenta is one of those flexible and versatile recipes that can be prepared in a number of ways. You can use water, milk, chicken stock, or vegetable broth to cook the corn for polenta.

The recipe for cooking polenta often depends on family traditions and personal preferences. And as evidenced by my husband, it can be customized by adding grated Parmesan cheese, butter, and/or any combination of fresh herbs and spices. Or sausage!

We often eat a simple bowl full of creamy polenta with sausage or various toppings. Grilled or fried polenta makes an excellent side dish, too. In fact, while I’d never had polenta at all until I met my husband, I never tried fried polenta until we were on our honeymoon! That was just not how his family served it. (But, dang, it was good!)

Some traditionalists argue that water is the only acceptable choice for making polenta because it yields the lightest, most distinctively corn flavor. On the other hand, some argue that chicken or vegetable stock infuses the polenta with more flavor, while others prefer the richer and creamier taste associated with adding milk or half & half.

Is this creamy polenta recipe gluten free?

Yes. In its simplest form, polenta is simply cornmeal and water. Since corn is gluten free, polenta makes for a good starchy dish for those who are avoiding wheat and gluten.

Is this a vegan polenta recipe?

Again, yes, in its simplest form. Made with water and sans any extra additions (as spelled out below), polenta is completely vegan. If you’ve got a “mixed” household, you can make the polenta with water, then scoop out enough for the vegans in the family before stirring in any extras (like sausage or butter).

How to make polenta

This polenta recipe is made on the stove top. While it’s not a difficult recipe to make, it does require that you stick close by to stir the pot as the cornmeal cooks. This remains the same whether you use water or opt for a richer liquid such as broth or milk.

Once the cornmeal is cooked, you can serve the creamy polenta right out of the pot, topped with this delicious braised Tuscan pork or even a meaty marinara sauce).

To make grilled or fried polenta, pour the cooked polenta into a baking dish to cool. Polenta firms up as it cools, which allows you to cut it into the triangular shapes that are perfect for grilling or frying it.

Whether you opt for creamy polenta or grilled polenta, you can’t go wrong serving it with this beef ragu!


Now, don’t be worried if you don’t know! I had never heard of polenta until I married my Italian husband. Polenta is a very simple porridge, if you will, made of cornmeal. If you’re thinking, “that sounds a lot like grits” you wouldn’t be too far off base.

What’s the difference between polenta and grits?

Polenta is a staple in Italian cuisine, made of yellow cornmeal, usually ground coarsely. Grits, commonly served in the southern part of the United States, are made of a more finely ground white corn.

I was first introduced to a creamy polenta, cooked on the stovetop. But instead of sticking with just polenta, my husband stirred in browned Italian sausage and cheese. Talk about comfort food!

Polenta is one of those flexible and versatile recipes that can be prepared in a number of ways. You can use water, milk, chicken stock, or vegetable broth to cook the corn for polenta.

The recipe for cooking polenta often depends on family traditions and personal preferences. And as evidenced by my husband, it can be customized by adding grated Parmesan cheese, butter, and/or any combination of fresh herbs and spices. Or sausage!

We often eat a simple bowl full of creamy polenta with sausage or various toppings. Grilled or fried polenta makes an excellent side dish, too. In fact, while I’d never had polenta at all until I met my husband, I never tried fried polenta until we were on our honeymoon! That was just not how his family served it. (But, dang, it was good!)

Some traditionalists argue that water is the only acceptable choice for making polenta because it yields the lightest, most distinctively corn flavor. On the other hand, some argue that chicken or vegetable stock infuses the polenta with more flavor, while others prefer the richer and creamier taste associated with adding milk or half & half.

Is this creamy polenta recipe gluten free?

Yes. In its simplest form, polenta is simply cornmeal and water. Since corn is gluten free, polenta makes for a good starchy dish for those who are avoiding wheat and gluten.

Is this a vegan polenta recipe?

Again, yes, in its simplest form. Made with water and sans any extra additions (as spelled out below), polenta is completely vegan. If you’ve got a “mixed” household, you can make the polenta with water, then scoop out enough for the vegans in the family before stirring in any extras (like sausage or butter).

How to make polenta

This polenta recipe is made on the stove top. While it’s not a difficult recipe to make, it does require that you stick close by to stir the pot as the cornmeal cooks. This remains the same whether you use water or opt for a richer liquid such as broth or milk.

Once the cornmeal is cooked, you can serve the creamy polenta right out of the pot, topped with this delicious braised Tuscan pork or even a meaty marinara sauce).

To make grilled or fried polenta, pour the cooked polenta into a baking dish to cool. Polenta firms up as it cools, which allows you to cut it into the triangular shapes that are perfect for grilling or frying it.

Whether you opt for creamy polenta or grilled polenta, you can’t go wrong serving it with this beef ragu!


Now, don’t be worried if you don’t know! I had never heard of polenta until I married my Italian husband. Polenta is a very simple porridge, if you will, made of cornmeal. If you’re thinking, “that sounds a lot like grits” you wouldn’t be too far off base.

What’s the difference between polenta and grits?

Polenta is a staple in Italian cuisine, made of yellow cornmeal, usually ground coarsely. Grits, commonly served in the southern part of the United States, are made of a more finely ground white corn.

I was first introduced to a creamy polenta, cooked on the stovetop. But instead of sticking with just polenta, my husband stirred in browned Italian sausage and cheese. Talk about comfort food!

Polenta is one of those flexible and versatile recipes that can be prepared in a number of ways. You can use water, milk, chicken stock, or vegetable broth to cook the corn for polenta.

The recipe for cooking polenta often depends on family traditions and personal preferences. And as evidenced by my husband, it can be customized by adding grated Parmesan cheese, butter, and/or any combination of fresh herbs and spices. Or sausage!

We often eat a simple bowl full of creamy polenta with sausage or various toppings. Grilled or fried polenta makes an excellent side dish, too. In fact, while I’d never had polenta at all until I met my husband, I never tried fried polenta until we were on our honeymoon! That was just not how his family served it. (But, dang, it was good!)

Some traditionalists argue that water is the only acceptable choice for making polenta because it yields the lightest, most distinctively corn flavor. On the other hand, some argue that chicken or vegetable stock infuses the polenta with more flavor, while others prefer the richer and creamier taste associated with adding milk or half & half.

Is this creamy polenta recipe gluten free?

Yes. In its simplest form, polenta is simply cornmeal and water. Since corn is gluten free, polenta makes for a good starchy dish for those who are avoiding wheat and gluten.

Is this a vegan polenta recipe?

Again, yes, in its simplest form. Made with water and sans any extra additions (as spelled out below), polenta is completely vegan. If you’ve got a “mixed” household, you can make the polenta with water, then scoop out enough for the vegans in the family before stirring in any extras (like sausage or butter).

How to make polenta

This polenta recipe is made on the stove top. While it’s not a difficult recipe to make, it does require that you stick close by to stir the pot as the cornmeal cooks. This remains the same whether you use water or opt for a richer liquid such as broth or milk.

Once the cornmeal is cooked, you can serve the creamy polenta right out of the pot, topped with this delicious braised Tuscan pork or even a meaty marinara sauce).

To make grilled or fried polenta, pour the cooked polenta into a baking dish to cool. Polenta firms up as it cools, which allows you to cut it into the triangular shapes that are perfect for grilling or frying it.

Whether you opt for creamy polenta or grilled polenta, you can’t go wrong serving it with this beef ragu!


Watch the video: How to Grill Corn, Three Ways (August 2022).