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Grilled Ribs With Homemade Sriracha BBQ Sauce

Grilled Ribs With Homemade Sriracha BBQ Sauce



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Perfect for summer grilling

This pork rib recipe is great for grilling on a nice summer day. You can make your own homemade spicy BBQ sauce using Sriracha.

Ingredients

For the ribs

  • 1 package McCormick® Grill Mates® Slow & Low Memphis Pit BBQ Rub
  • 2 racks pork baby back ribs, about 4 pounds

For the Sriracha BBQ sauce

  • 3/4 Pounds fresh Fresno chilies, stemmed and coarsely chopped do not remove seeds
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 can of tomato sauce
  • 1/2 Cup water
  • 1/4 Cup firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 1/4 Cup molasses
  • 1/4 Cup white vinegar
  • 1 Teaspoon McCormick® Paprika
  • 1 Teaspoon McCormick Gourmet™ Sicilian Sea Salt

Putney Farm

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce.

We do love our ribs here at the farm. And, without a doubt, we love Memphis-style barbecue ribs with a dry rub, mop and slow smoking over applewood and hickory. Toss in some hot, vinegary Carolina barbecue sauce and Nirvana awaits. But we just made it into spring, the rains come and go, it’s still cold and the smoker needs to be set up (and we are tired from working in the garden). Time to turn on the oven.

And there is nothing wrong with making ribs in the oven. In fact, some would argue that it may be a better place to cook ribs, assuming you use the right tools/technique and choose the right seasoning and sauce. The one thing that is really hard to do is get the deep smokey flavor and “smoke ring” color from the oven. But you can get very flavorful, tender ribs.

As for the tools and technique, the main thing you need is some time, sauce (we will get there) and aluminium foil. The big thing with ribs is that they need to cook low and slow and, preferably, in a moist environment so they don’t dry out. This is particularly true for baby back ribs, which don’t carry much extra fat. But if you season and sauce the ribs and then wrap in a packet of foil, you can trap the juices from the ribs and gently steam the ribs for a few hours until they reach the desired temperature of 185 F. You need the temperature to get at least to 185 so the collagen in the meat turns to gelatin (that luscious texture) and the ribs get tender. Then you open the foil packets, add some more sauce and finish the ribs under the broiler for a few minutes to get a nice crispy, caramelized crust. Easy, but like most good things, you need a few extra steps.

And now for the sauce. Since we don’t feel we can get a southern-style smokey flavor, we look more to Asian flavors. Instead of a base of ketchup, cider vinegar, Worcestershire and hot sauce, we go with ketchup, onion, garlic, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar and Sriracha. You get a familiar texture of barbecue sauce but the more Asian-inspired notes and some heat. And you can control the heat to your liking by just adding or subtracting Sriracha and/or some red pepper flake. Good stuff and good fun.

One last note on cooking the ribs. It will take about 2 hours baking in the foil to get tender ribs that still have a little “toothiness”. But if you like “fall-off-the-bone” tender ribs add another 15-30 minutes of cooking. And right about now you may hear a food snob someone say “technically ribs aren’t supposed to fall off the bone”. Hmmm. That may be true in barbecue contests, where they don’t want people “cheating” by boiling or steaming their ribs to make them more tender. But last we checked 99.99999% of ribs are cooked at home or restaurants, not contests. If you like “fall-off-the bone” ribs, go ahead and make them- just budget a bit more cooking time. We think that “technically” enjoying your food is the most important thing…..but we are silly that way.

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce:

  • If you don’t want the Sriracha barbecue sauce you can use the same cooking method and rub the ribs with standard pork rub and then glaze with traditional barbecue sauce.
  • You can substitute spare ribs for baby backs, and they will be very good. Just expect another 45-60 minutes of cooking time.

What You Get: Tender, flavorful ribs, with a hot, tangy sauce. All cooked indoors.

What You Need: A lot of aluminium foil. Check your roll before you start.

How Long? About 3 hours with 30 minutes of active time. Mostly a weekend dish, but easy to prepare ahead of time.


Putney Farm

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce.

We do love our ribs here at the farm. And, without a doubt, we love Memphis-style barbecue ribs with a dry rub, mop and slow smoking over applewood and hickory. Toss in some hot, vinegary Carolina barbecue sauce and Nirvana awaits. But we just made it into spring, the rains come and go, it’s still cold and the smoker needs to be set up (and we are tired from working in the garden). Time to turn on the oven.

And there is nothing wrong with making ribs in the oven. In fact, some would argue that it may be a better place to cook ribs, assuming you use the right tools/technique and choose the right seasoning and sauce. The one thing that is really hard to do is get the deep smokey flavor and “smoke ring” color from the oven. But you can get very flavorful, tender ribs.

As for the tools and technique, the main thing you need is some time, sauce (we will get there) and aluminium foil. The big thing with ribs is that they need to cook low and slow and, preferably, in a moist environment so they don’t dry out. This is particularly true for baby back ribs, which don’t carry much extra fat. But if you season and sauce the ribs and then wrap in a packet of foil, you can trap the juices from the ribs and gently steam the ribs for a few hours until they reach the desired temperature of 185 F. You need the temperature to get at least to 185 so the collagen in the meat turns to gelatin (that luscious texture) and the ribs get tender. Then you open the foil packets, add some more sauce and finish the ribs under the broiler for a few minutes to get a nice crispy, caramelized crust. Easy, but like most good things, you need a few extra steps.

And now for the sauce. Since we don’t feel we can get a southern-style smokey flavor, we look more to Asian flavors. Instead of a base of ketchup, cider vinegar, Worcestershire and hot sauce, we go with ketchup, onion, garlic, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar and Sriracha. You get a familiar texture of barbecue sauce but the more Asian-inspired notes and some heat. And you can control the heat to your liking by just adding or subtracting Sriracha and/or some red pepper flake. Good stuff and good fun.

One last note on cooking the ribs. It will take about 2 hours baking in the foil to get tender ribs that still have a little “toothiness”. But if you like “fall-off-the-bone” tender ribs add another 15-30 minutes of cooking. And right about now you may hear a food snob someone say “technically ribs aren’t supposed to fall off the bone”. Hmmm. That may be true in barbecue contests, where they don’t want people “cheating” by boiling or steaming their ribs to make them more tender. But last we checked 99.99999% of ribs are cooked at home or restaurants, not contests. If you like “fall-off-the bone” ribs, go ahead and make them- just budget a bit more cooking time. We think that “technically” enjoying your food is the most important thing…..but we are silly that way.

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce:

  • If you don’t want the Sriracha barbecue sauce you can use the same cooking method and rub the ribs with standard pork rub and then glaze with traditional barbecue sauce.
  • You can substitute spare ribs for baby backs, and they will be very good. Just expect another 45-60 minutes of cooking time.

What You Get: Tender, flavorful ribs, with a hot, tangy sauce. All cooked indoors.

What You Need: A lot of aluminium foil. Check your roll before you start.

How Long? About 3 hours with 30 minutes of active time. Mostly a weekend dish, but easy to prepare ahead of time.


Putney Farm

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce.

We do love our ribs here at the farm. And, without a doubt, we love Memphis-style barbecue ribs with a dry rub, mop and slow smoking over applewood and hickory. Toss in some hot, vinegary Carolina barbecue sauce and Nirvana awaits. But we just made it into spring, the rains come and go, it’s still cold and the smoker needs to be set up (and we are tired from working in the garden). Time to turn on the oven.

And there is nothing wrong with making ribs in the oven. In fact, some would argue that it may be a better place to cook ribs, assuming you use the right tools/technique and choose the right seasoning and sauce. The one thing that is really hard to do is get the deep smokey flavor and “smoke ring” color from the oven. But you can get very flavorful, tender ribs.

As for the tools and technique, the main thing you need is some time, sauce (we will get there) and aluminium foil. The big thing with ribs is that they need to cook low and slow and, preferably, in a moist environment so they don’t dry out. This is particularly true for baby back ribs, which don’t carry much extra fat. But if you season and sauce the ribs and then wrap in a packet of foil, you can trap the juices from the ribs and gently steam the ribs for a few hours until they reach the desired temperature of 185 F. You need the temperature to get at least to 185 so the collagen in the meat turns to gelatin (that luscious texture) and the ribs get tender. Then you open the foil packets, add some more sauce and finish the ribs under the broiler for a few minutes to get a nice crispy, caramelized crust. Easy, but like most good things, you need a few extra steps.

And now for the sauce. Since we don’t feel we can get a southern-style smokey flavor, we look more to Asian flavors. Instead of a base of ketchup, cider vinegar, Worcestershire and hot sauce, we go with ketchup, onion, garlic, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar and Sriracha. You get a familiar texture of barbecue sauce but the more Asian-inspired notes and some heat. And you can control the heat to your liking by just adding or subtracting Sriracha and/or some red pepper flake. Good stuff and good fun.

One last note on cooking the ribs. It will take about 2 hours baking in the foil to get tender ribs that still have a little “toothiness”. But if you like “fall-off-the-bone” tender ribs add another 15-30 minutes of cooking. And right about now you may hear a food snob someone say “technically ribs aren’t supposed to fall off the bone”. Hmmm. That may be true in barbecue contests, where they don’t want people “cheating” by boiling or steaming their ribs to make them more tender. But last we checked 99.99999% of ribs are cooked at home or restaurants, not contests. If you like “fall-off-the bone” ribs, go ahead and make them- just budget a bit more cooking time. We think that “technically” enjoying your food is the most important thing…..but we are silly that way.

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce:

  • If you don’t want the Sriracha barbecue sauce you can use the same cooking method and rub the ribs with standard pork rub and then glaze with traditional barbecue sauce.
  • You can substitute spare ribs for baby backs, and they will be very good. Just expect another 45-60 minutes of cooking time.

What You Get: Tender, flavorful ribs, with a hot, tangy sauce. All cooked indoors.

What You Need: A lot of aluminium foil. Check your roll before you start.

How Long? About 3 hours with 30 minutes of active time. Mostly a weekend dish, but easy to prepare ahead of time.


Putney Farm

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce.

We do love our ribs here at the farm. And, without a doubt, we love Memphis-style barbecue ribs with a dry rub, mop and slow smoking over applewood and hickory. Toss in some hot, vinegary Carolina barbecue sauce and Nirvana awaits. But we just made it into spring, the rains come and go, it’s still cold and the smoker needs to be set up (and we are tired from working in the garden). Time to turn on the oven.

And there is nothing wrong with making ribs in the oven. In fact, some would argue that it may be a better place to cook ribs, assuming you use the right tools/technique and choose the right seasoning and sauce. The one thing that is really hard to do is get the deep smokey flavor and “smoke ring” color from the oven. But you can get very flavorful, tender ribs.

As for the tools and technique, the main thing you need is some time, sauce (we will get there) and aluminium foil. The big thing with ribs is that they need to cook low and slow and, preferably, in a moist environment so they don’t dry out. This is particularly true for baby back ribs, which don’t carry much extra fat. But if you season and sauce the ribs and then wrap in a packet of foil, you can trap the juices from the ribs and gently steam the ribs for a few hours until they reach the desired temperature of 185 F. You need the temperature to get at least to 185 so the collagen in the meat turns to gelatin (that luscious texture) and the ribs get tender. Then you open the foil packets, add some more sauce and finish the ribs under the broiler for a few minutes to get a nice crispy, caramelized crust. Easy, but like most good things, you need a few extra steps.

And now for the sauce. Since we don’t feel we can get a southern-style smokey flavor, we look more to Asian flavors. Instead of a base of ketchup, cider vinegar, Worcestershire and hot sauce, we go with ketchup, onion, garlic, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar and Sriracha. You get a familiar texture of barbecue sauce but the more Asian-inspired notes and some heat. And you can control the heat to your liking by just adding or subtracting Sriracha and/or some red pepper flake. Good stuff and good fun.

One last note on cooking the ribs. It will take about 2 hours baking in the foil to get tender ribs that still have a little “toothiness”. But if you like “fall-off-the-bone” tender ribs add another 15-30 minutes of cooking. And right about now you may hear a food snob someone say “technically ribs aren’t supposed to fall off the bone”. Hmmm. That may be true in barbecue contests, where they don’t want people “cheating” by boiling or steaming their ribs to make them more tender. But last we checked 99.99999% of ribs are cooked at home or restaurants, not contests. If you like “fall-off-the bone” ribs, go ahead and make them- just budget a bit more cooking time. We think that “technically” enjoying your food is the most important thing…..but we are silly that way.

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce:

  • If you don’t want the Sriracha barbecue sauce you can use the same cooking method and rub the ribs with standard pork rub and then glaze with traditional barbecue sauce.
  • You can substitute spare ribs for baby backs, and they will be very good. Just expect another 45-60 minutes of cooking time.

What You Get: Tender, flavorful ribs, with a hot, tangy sauce. All cooked indoors.

What You Need: A lot of aluminium foil. Check your roll before you start.

How Long? About 3 hours with 30 minutes of active time. Mostly a weekend dish, but easy to prepare ahead of time.


Putney Farm

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce.

We do love our ribs here at the farm. And, without a doubt, we love Memphis-style barbecue ribs with a dry rub, mop and slow smoking over applewood and hickory. Toss in some hot, vinegary Carolina barbecue sauce and Nirvana awaits. But we just made it into spring, the rains come and go, it’s still cold and the smoker needs to be set up (and we are tired from working in the garden). Time to turn on the oven.

And there is nothing wrong with making ribs in the oven. In fact, some would argue that it may be a better place to cook ribs, assuming you use the right tools/technique and choose the right seasoning and sauce. The one thing that is really hard to do is get the deep smokey flavor and “smoke ring” color from the oven. But you can get very flavorful, tender ribs.

As for the tools and technique, the main thing you need is some time, sauce (we will get there) and aluminium foil. The big thing with ribs is that they need to cook low and slow and, preferably, in a moist environment so they don’t dry out. This is particularly true for baby back ribs, which don’t carry much extra fat. But if you season and sauce the ribs and then wrap in a packet of foil, you can trap the juices from the ribs and gently steam the ribs for a few hours until they reach the desired temperature of 185 F. You need the temperature to get at least to 185 so the collagen in the meat turns to gelatin (that luscious texture) and the ribs get tender. Then you open the foil packets, add some more sauce and finish the ribs under the broiler for a few minutes to get a nice crispy, caramelized crust. Easy, but like most good things, you need a few extra steps.

And now for the sauce. Since we don’t feel we can get a southern-style smokey flavor, we look more to Asian flavors. Instead of a base of ketchup, cider vinegar, Worcestershire and hot sauce, we go with ketchup, onion, garlic, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar and Sriracha. You get a familiar texture of barbecue sauce but the more Asian-inspired notes and some heat. And you can control the heat to your liking by just adding or subtracting Sriracha and/or some red pepper flake. Good stuff and good fun.

One last note on cooking the ribs. It will take about 2 hours baking in the foil to get tender ribs that still have a little “toothiness”. But if you like “fall-off-the-bone” tender ribs add another 15-30 minutes of cooking. And right about now you may hear a food snob someone say “technically ribs aren’t supposed to fall off the bone”. Hmmm. That may be true in barbecue contests, where they don’t want people “cheating” by boiling or steaming their ribs to make them more tender. But last we checked 99.99999% of ribs are cooked at home or restaurants, not contests. If you like “fall-off-the bone” ribs, go ahead and make them- just budget a bit more cooking time. We think that “technically” enjoying your food is the most important thing…..but we are silly that way.

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce:

  • If you don’t want the Sriracha barbecue sauce you can use the same cooking method and rub the ribs with standard pork rub and then glaze with traditional barbecue sauce.
  • You can substitute spare ribs for baby backs, and they will be very good. Just expect another 45-60 minutes of cooking time.

What You Get: Tender, flavorful ribs, with a hot, tangy sauce. All cooked indoors.

What You Need: A lot of aluminium foil. Check your roll before you start.

How Long? About 3 hours with 30 minutes of active time. Mostly a weekend dish, but easy to prepare ahead of time.


Putney Farm

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce.

We do love our ribs here at the farm. And, without a doubt, we love Memphis-style barbecue ribs with a dry rub, mop and slow smoking over applewood and hickory. Toss in some hot, vinegary Carolina barbecue sauce and Nirvana awaits. But we just made it into spring, the rains come and go, it’s still cold and the smoker needs to be set up (and we are tired from working in the garden). Time to turn on the oven.

And there is nothing wrong with making ribs in the oven. In fact, some would argue that it may be a better place to cook ribs, assuming you use the right tools/technique and choose the right seasoning and sauce. The one thing that is really hard to do is get the deep smokey flavor and “smoke ring” color from the oven. But you can get very flavorful, tender ribs.

As for the tools and technique, the main thing you need is some time, sauce (we will get there) and aluminium foil. The big thing with ribs is that they need to cook low and slow and, preferably, in a moist environment so they don’t dry out. This is particularly true for baby back ribs, which don’t carry much extra fat. But if you season and sauce the ribs and then wrap in a packet of foil, you can trap the juices from the ribs and gently steam the ribs for a few hours until they reach the desired temperature of 185 F. You need the temperature to get at least to 185 so the collagen in the meat turns to gelatin (that luscious texture) and the ribs get tender. Then you open the foil packets, add some more sauce and finish the ribs under the broiler for a few minutes to get a nice crispy, caramelized crust. Easy, but like most good things, you need a few extra steps.

And now for the sauce. Since we don’t feel we can get a southern-style smokey flavor, we look more to Asian flavors. Instead of a base of ketchup, cider vinegar, Worcestershire and hot sauce, we go with ketchup, onion, garlic, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar and Sriracha. You get a familiar texture of barbecue sauce but the more Asian-inspired notes and some heat. And you can control the heat to your liking by just adding or subtracting Sriracha and/or some red pepper flake. Good stuff and good fun.

One last note on cooking the ribs. It will take about 2 hours baking in the foil to get tender ribs that still have a little “toothiness”. But if you like “fall-off-the-bone” tender ribs add another 15-30 minutes of cooking. And right about now you may hear a food snob someone say “technically ribs aren’t supposed to fall off the bone”. Hmmm. That may be true in barbecue contests, where they don’t want people “cheating” by boiling or steaming their ribs to make them more tender. But last we checked 99.99999% of ribs are cooked at home or restaurants, not contests. If you like “fall-off-the bone” ribs, go ahead and make them- just budget a bit more cooking time. We think that “technically” enjoying your food is the most important thing…..but we are silly that way.

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce:

  • If you don’t want the Sriracha barbecue sauce you can use the same cooking method and rub the ribs with standard pork rub and then glaze with traditional barbecue sauce.
  • You can substitute spare ribs for baby backs, and they will be very good. Just expect another 45-60 minutes of cooking time.

What You Get: Tender, flavorful ribs, with a hot, tangy sauce. All cooked indoors.

What You Need: A lot of aluminium foil. Check your roll before you start.

How Long? About 3 hours with 30 minutes of active time. Mostly a weekend dish, but easy to prepare ahead of time.


Putney Farm

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce.

We do love our ribs here at the farm. And, without a doubt, we love Memphis-style barbecue ribs with a dry rub, mop and slow smoking over applewood and hickory. Toss in some hot, vinegary Carolina barbecue sauce and Nirvana awaits. But we just made it into spring, the rains come and go, it’s still cold and the smoker needs to be set up (and we are tired from working in the garden). Time to turn on the oven.

And there is nothing wrong with making ribs in the oven. In fact, some would argue that it may be a better place to cook ribs, assuming you use the right tools/technique and choose the right seasoning and sauce. The one thing that is really hard to do is get the deep smokey flavor and “smoke ring” color from the oven. But you can get very flavorful, tender ribs.

As for the tools and technique, the main thing you need is some time, sauce (we will get there) and aluminium foil. The big thing with ribs is that they need to cook low and slow and, preferably, in a moist environment so they don’t dry out. This is particularly true for baby back ribs, which don’t carry much extra fat. But if you season and sauce the ribs and then wrap in a packet of foil, you can trap the juices from the ribs and gently steam the ribs for a few hours until they reach the desired temperature of 185 F. You need the temperature to get at least to 185 so the collagen in the meat turns to gelatin (that luscious texture) and the ribs get tender. Then you open the foil packets, add some more sauce and finish the ribs under the broiler for a few minutes to get a nice crispy, caramelized crust. Easy, but like most good things, you need a few extra steps.

And now for the sauce. Since we don’t feel we can get a southern-style smokey flavor, we look more to Asian flavors. Instead of a base of ketchup, cider vinegar, Worcestershire and hot sauce, we go with ketchup, onion, garlic, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar and Sriracha. You get a familiar texture of barbecue sauce but the more Asian-inspired notes and some heat. And you can control the heat to your liking by just adding or subtracting Sriracha and/or some red pepper flake. Good stuff and good fun.

One last note on cooking the ribs. It will take about 2 hours baking in the foil to get tender ribs that still have a little “toothiness”. But if you like “fall-off-the-bone” tender ribs add another 15-30 minutes of cooking. And right about now you may hear a food snob someone say “technically ribs aren’t supposed to fall off the bone”. Hmmm. That may be true in barbecue contests, where they don’t want people “cheating” by boiling or steaming their ribs to make them more tender. But last we checked 99.99999% of ribs are cooked at home or restaurants, not contests. If you like “fall-off-the bone” ribs, go ahead and make them- just budget a bit more cooking time. We think that “technically” enjoying your food is the most important thing…..but we are silly that way.

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce:

  • If you don’t want the Sriracha barbecue sauce you can use the same cooking method and rub the ribs with standard pork rub and then glaze with traditional barbecue sauce.
  • You can substitute spare ribs for baby backs, and they will be very good. Just expect another 45-60 minutes of cooking time.

What You Get: Tender, flavorful ribs, with a hot, tangy sauce. All cooked indoors.

What You Need: A lot of aluminium foil. Check your roll before you start.

How Long? About 3 hours with 30 minutes of active time. Mostly a weekend dish, but easy to prepare ahead of time.


Putney Farm

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce.

We do love our ribs here at the farm. And, without a doubt, we love Memphis-style barbecue ribs with a dry rub, mop and slow smoking over applewood and hickory. Toss in some hot, vinegary Carolina barbecue sauce and Nirvana awaits. But we just made it into spring, the rains come and go, it’s still cold and the smoker needs to be set up (and we are tired from working in the garden). Time to turn on the oven.

And there is nothing wrong with making ribs in the oven. In fact, some would argue that it may be a better place to cook ribs, assuming you use the right tools/technique and choose the right seasoning and sauce. The one thing that is really hard to do is get the deep smokey flavor and “smoke ring” color from the oven. But you can get very flavorful, tender ribs.

As for the tools and technique, the main thing you need is some time, sauce (we will get there) and aluminium foil. The big thing with ribs is that they need to cook low and slow and, preferably, in a moist environment so they don’t dry out. This is particularly true for baby back ribs, which don’t carry much extra fat. But if you season and sauce the ribs and then wrap in a packet of foil, you can trap the juices from the ribs and gently steam the ribs for a few hours until they reach the desired temperature of 185 F. You need the temperature to get at least to 185 so the collagen in the meat turns to gelatin (that luscious texture) and the ribs get tender. Then you open the foil packets, add some more sauce and finish the ribs under the broiler for a few minutes to get a nice crispy, caramelized crust. Easy, but like most good things, you need a few extra steps.

And now for the sauce. Since we don’t feel we can get a southern-style smokey flavor, we look more to Asian flavors. Instead of a base of ketchup, cider vinegar, Worcestershire and hot sauce, we go with ketchup, onion, garlic, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar and Sriracha. You get a familiar texture of barbecue sauce but the more Asian-inspired notes and some heat. And you can control the heat to your liking by just adding or subtracting Sriracha and/or some red pepper flake. Good stuff and good fun.

One last note on cooking the ribs. It will take about 2 hours baking in the foil to get tender ribs that still have a little “toothiness”. But if you like “fall-off-the-bone” tender ribs add another 15-30 minutes of cooking. And right about now you may hear a food snob someone say “technically ribs aren’t supposed to fall off the bone”. Hmmm. That may be true in barbecue contests, where they don’t want people “cheating” by boiling or steaming their ribs to make them more tender. But last we checked 99.99999% of ribs are cooked at home or restaurants, not contests. If you like “fall-off-the bone” ribs, go ahead and make them- just budget a bit more cooking time. We think that “technically” enjoying your food is the most important thing…..but we are silly that way.

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce:

  • If you don’t want the Sriracha barbecue sauce you can use the same cooking method and rub the ribs with standard pork rub and then glaze with traditional barbecue sauce.
  • You can substitute spare ribs for baby backs, and they will be very good. Just expect another 45-60 minutes of cooking time.

What You Get: Tender, flavorful ribs, with a hot, tangy sauce. All cooked indoors.

What You Need: A lot of aluminium foil. Check your roll before you start.

How Long? About 3 hours with 30 minutes of active time. Mostly a weekend dish, but easy to prepare ahead of time.


Putney Farm

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce.

We do love our ribs here at the farm. And, without a doubt, we love Memphis-style barbecue ribs with a dry rub, mop and slow smoking over applewood and hickory. Toss in some hot, vinegary Carolina barbecue sauce and Nirvana awaits. But we just made it into spring, the rains come and go, it’s still cold and the smoker needs to be set up (and we are tired from working in the garden). Time to turn on the oven.

And there is nothing wrong with making ribs in the oven. In fact, some would argue that it may be a better place to cook ribs, assuming you use the right tools/technique and choose the right seasoning and sauce. The one thing that is really hard to do is get the deep smokey flavor and “smoke ring” color from the oven. But you can get very flavorful, tender ribs.

As for the tools and technique, the main thing you need is some time, sauce (we will get there) and aluminium foil. The big thing with ribs is that they need to cook low and slow and, preferably, in a moist environment so they don’t dry out. This is particularly true for baby back ribs, which don’t carry much extra fat. But if you season and sauce the ribs and then wrap in a packet of foil, you can trap the juices from the ribs and gently steam the ribs for a few hours until they reach the desired temperature of 185 F. You need the temperature to get at least to 185 so the collagen in the meat turns to gelatin (that luscious texture) and the ribs get tender. Then you open the foil packets, add some more sauce and finish the ribs under the broiler for a few minutes to get a nice crispy, caramelized crust. Easy, but like most good things, you need a few extra steps.

And now for the sauce. Since we don’t feel we can get a southern-style smokey flavor, we look more to Asian flavors. Instead of a base of ketchup, cider vinegar, Worcestershire and hot sauce, we go with ketchup, onion, garlic, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar and Sriracha. You get a familiar texture of barbecue sauce but the more Asian-inspired notes and some heat. And you can control the heat to your liking by just adding or subtracting Sriracha and/or some red pepper flake. Good stuff and good fun.

One last note on cooking the ribs. It will take about 2 hours baking in the foil to get tender ribs that still have a little “toothiness”. But if you like “fall-off-the-bone” tender ribs add another 15-30 minutes of cooking. And right about now you may hear a food snob someone say “technically ribs aren’t supposed to fall off the bone”. Hmmm. That may be true in barbecue contests, where they don’t want people “cheating” by boiling or steaming their ribs to make them more tender. But last we checked 99.99999% of ribs are cooked at home or restaurants, not contests. If you like “fall-off-the bone” ribs, go ahead and make them- just budget a bit more cooking time. We think that “technically” enjoying your food is the most important thing…..but we are silly that way.

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce:

  • If you don’t want the Sriracha barbecue sauce you can use the same cooking method and rub the ribs with standard pork rub and then glaze with traditional barbecue sauce.
  • You can substitute spare ribs for baby backs, and they will be very good. Just expect another 45-60 minutes of cooking time.

What You Get: Tender, flavorful ribs, with a hot, tangy sauce. All cooked indoors.

What You Need: A lot of aluminium foil. Check your roll before you start.

How Long? About 3 hours with 30 minutes of active time. Mostly a weekend dish, but easy to prepare ahead of time.


Putney Farm

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce.

We do love our ribs here at the farm. And, without a doubt, we love Memphis-style barbecue ribs with a dry rub, mop and slow smoking over applewood and hickory. Toss in some hot, vinegary Carolina barbecue sauce and Nirvana awaits. But we just made it into spring, the rains come and go, it’s still cold and the smoker needs to be set up (and we are tired from working in the garden). Time to turn on the oven.

And there is nothing wrong with making ribs in the oven. In fact, some would argue that it may be a better place to cook ribs, assuming you use the right tools/technique and choose the right seasoning and sauce. The one thing that is really hard to do is get the deep smokey flavor and “smoke ring” color from the oven. But you can get very flavorful, tender ribs.

As for the tools and technique, the main thing you need is some time, sauce (we will get there) and aluminium foil. The big thing with ribs is that they need to cook low and slow and, preferably, in a moist environment so they don’t dry out. This is particularly true for baby back ribs, which don’t carry much extra fat. But if you season and sauce the ribs and then wrap in a packet of foil, you can trap the juices from the ribs and gently steam the ribs for a few hours until they reach the desired temperature of 185 F. You need the temperature to get at least to 185 so the collagen in the meat turns to gelatin (that luscious texture) and the ribs get tender. Then you open the foil packets, add some more sauce and finish the ribs under the broiler for a few minutes to get a nice crispy, caramelized crust. Easy, but like most good things, you need a few extra steps.

And now for the sauce. Since we don’t feel we can get a southern-style smokey flavor, we look more to Asian flavors. Instead of a base of ketchup, cider vinegar, Worcestershire and hot sauce, we go with ketchup, onion, garlic, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar and Sriracha. You get a familiar texture of barbecue sauce but the more Asian-inspired notes and some heat. And you can control the heat to your liking by just adding or subtracting Sriracha and/or some red pepper flake. Good stuff and good fun.

One last note on cooking the ribs. It will take about 2 hours baking in the foil to get tender ribs that still have a little “toothiness”. But if you like “fall-off-the-bone” tender ribs add another 15-30 minutes of cooking. And right about now you may hear a food snob someone say “technically ribs aren’t supposed to fall off the bone”. Hmmm. That may be true in barbecue contests, where they don’t want people “cheating” by boiling or steaming their ribs to make them more tender. But last we checked 99.99999% of ribs are cooked at home or restaurants, not contests. If you like “fall-off-the bone” ribs, go ahead and make them- just budget a bit more cooking time. We think that “technically” enjoying your food is the most important thing…..but we are silly that way.

Easy Oven Ribs With Sriracha Barbecue Sauce:

  • If you don’t want the Sriracha barbecue sauce you can use the same cooking method and rub the ribs with standard pork rub and then glaze with traditional barbecue sauce.
  • You can substitute spare ribs for baby backs, and they will be very good. Just expect another 45-60 minutes of cooking time.

What You Get: Tender, flavorful ribs, with a hot, tangy sauce. All cooked indoors.

What You Need: A lot of aluminium foil. Check your roll before you start.

How Long? About 3 hours with 30 minutes of active time. Mostly a weekend dish, but easy to prepare ahead of time.